Currently viewing the category: "Narratology"

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The locative narrative The Lost Index: NATMUS  was featured at 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling in Copenhagen.

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The Lost Index: NATMUS, photo James Brocklehurst

Audio guides and games have long been staple modes of interpretation in museums. The medium of locative narrative, defined here as participatory site-specific story experiences that are heard on headphones, offers alternative modes of engagement with archives and collections where the visitor becomes a participant in an unfolding drama. The confluence of the existent world and narrative representations is an often-reported feature of “mixed reality” [1] experiences [2] [3] [4].

The Lost Index: NATMUS (2015-) [5], produced by Trulyimagined, aka Emma Whittaker and James Brocklehurst, is an interactive narrative that transforms the location of a museum into a dystopian story world. Situated at The National Museum of Denmark and the DieselHouse museum it explores how participants can experience the story across spatially distributed locations.

The Lost Index: NATMUS Copenhagen photo James Brocklehurst

The Lost Index: NATMUS Copenhagen photo James Brocklehurst

Your phone rings, “You have been selected… your help is required … time is running out…” Searching for objects from the lost index holds the key to stabilising the changes. In response to their actions participants receive phone calls – fragmentary updates from which possible stories build. But as time runs out the uncertain future draws nearer and so too does the metamorphosis of the museum. Binaural soundscapes layered with ambient sounds stimulate perceptual illusions and combine with attention focusing techniques to alter the perception of the environment.

Binaural compositions simulate the aural qualities of the fictional locations whose sounds are plotted temporally and spatially within the different museums’ rooms. Sounds are movement responsive and triggered by participants’ own smartphones through novel uses of Bluetooth low energy ‘iBeacons’. As the drama proceeds, the recorded auditory dimensions of the rooms’ subtlety change that can affect the interpretation of sounds as live, recorded or imagined.

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Participants, in the role of protagonist, move simultaneously within the story’s locations and museum, physically situating the player within a fictional world of the game. The Lost Index: NATMUS develops William James’s [6] radical empiricist insight as an approach to interactive narrative that plays with the contexts of players’ beliefs, directing and misdirecting their attention and keeping knowing in transit.

and the Dieselhouse museum, Copenhagen photo Emma Whittaker

The Lost Index: NATMUS at the National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen photo Emma Whittaker

The Lost Index: NATMUS can be downloaded from the iOS App Store for use at The National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagenand the Dieselhouse museum, Copenhagen. Headphones are required.

https://vimeo.com/108626316

[1] Milgram, P. & Kishino, F. (1994). ‘Taxonomy of Mixed Reality Visual Displays’. IEICE Transactions on Information and Systems. Vol. E77-D, No.12 December 1994. <http://etclab.mie.utoronto.ca/people/paul_dir/IEICE94/ieice.html>

[2] Montola, M., Stenros, J. & Waern, A. (2010) Pervasive Games, Theory & Design. Burlington: Morgan Kaufmann

[3] Benford, S. Crabtree, A. Reeves, S. et al (2006) The Frame of the Game: Blurring the Boundary between Fiction and Reality in Mobile Experiences. CHI 2006, April 2227, 2006, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

[4] Reid, J. (2008) ‘Design for Coincidence: Incorporating Real World Artefacts in Location Based Games’. DIMEA’08, Athens, September 10–12.

[5] Whittaker, E. & Brocklehurst, J. R. (2015) ‘The Lost Index: NATMUS’ [iOS Application]. Apple Inc. [https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-lost-index-natmus/id1058419473?mt=8]

[5] Whittaker, E. (2016) ‘Inside the Snow globe: Pragmatisms, belief and the ambiguous objectivity of the imaginary’. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research, Vol. 13, No. 3 

RIDERS

RIDERS Project Event

25 November 2013, Manchester

This event will mix creatives with computer scientists to create a day of synergy, IS exploration and great networking opportunities.

There are a talented and diverse line up of speakers,  Christine Wilks, Daniel Kudenko, and Oliver Case. Nathan Jones from mercyonline, the experimental literary and new media organisation, running the digital creative writing workshop so members can get hands on with some experiential digital writing. The full agenda on the talks and workshop to follow shortly.

Spaces will be limited, first come, first served. Interested parties can email Vivienne at: v.m.macdonald@hw.ac.uk to notify their wish to attend.

“For as long has humans have lived in communities, storytelling has bound people to each other and to their
environments. In recent times, scholars have noted how social networks arise around issues of resource and
ecological management. In this book, Raul Lejano, Mrill Ingram, and Helen Ingram argue that stories, or
narratives, play a key role; that these emergent networks essentially “narrate themselves into existence”.

The authors propose the notion of the narrative-network, and introduce innovative tools to analyze the plots, characters, and events that inform environmental action. Their analysis sheds light on how environmental networks can emerge in unlikely contexts and sustain themselves against great odds.

The authors present three case studies that demonstrate the power of narrative and narratology in the analysis of environmental networks: a conservation network in the Sonoran Desert, which achieved some success despite US-Mexico border issues; a narrative that bridged differences between community and scientists in the Turtle Islands; and networks of researchers and farmers who collaborated to develop and sustain alternative agriculture practice in the face of government inaction. These cases demonstrate that by paying attention to language and storytelling, we can improve our understanding of environmental behavior and even change it in positive ways.

22 paper | £15.95 | 978-0-262-51957-1 | 240 pp.,

Raul Lejano is Associate Professor in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, & Human Development at New York University and the author of Frameworks for Policy Analysis: Merging Text and Context.

Mrill Ingram, a PhD in Geography, is an independent scholar in Madison, Wisconsin.

Helen Ingram is Research Fellow at the Southwest Center, University of Arizona,
and Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author/editor of numerous books, including Reflections on Water: New Approaches to Transboundary Conflicts and Cooperation (MIT Press, 2001).”
http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/power-narrative-environmental-networks
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Power-of-Narrative-in-Environmental-Networks/1376580422562614

Expanded Narrative Symposium

Image by James Brocklehurst ‘Expanded Narrative Symposium’

Date of Symposium:

2 November 2013

Additional Symposium Events and Performances:

1 – 2 November

Description:

The Expanded Narrative Symposium explores the multidisciplinary field of interactive narrative that reconfigures the form and expands the experience of storytelling. The reader, relocated, becomes a player, co-author or participant. How can we design, develop and experience locative sound, participatory theatre, pervasive and mobile games, flash fiction and works yet to be defined? Through the consideration of these questions, the symposium aims to promote knowledge exchange and collaboration between practitioners from the arts, academia and the creative industries.

The symposium’s interconnected themes of story, sound, performance, games and space reflect the interdisciplinary nature of Expanded Narrative, examined by leading names.

Find out more on the symposium webpage

Book Here

The symposium is supported by the EU project VIVID in conjunction with the School of Art & Design Southampton Solent University, LiteratureWorks, Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University Faculty of Arts Teaching & Learning, The School of Art and Media, MADr and The School of Humanities and Performing Arts.

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ICIDS 2012

Call for Papers ICIDS 2012

“ICIDS is the premier international conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (IDS), bringing together researchers interested in presenting recent results, sharing novel techniques, and exchanging ideas about this exciting new media. IDS redefines the narrative experience by empowering the audience to significantly participate in the story due to advances in technology. [Continue Reading…]

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Expanded Narrative is an online resource for practitioners, educators and researchers. It is concerned with interactive narrative and storytelling in its multifarious forms from locative media and sound to experimental performance and games.

Expanded Narrative – Videos, offers an evolving directory of interviews that discuss work, approaches and methods with practitioners and experts in the field. Links are provided to examples of work, related information and articles.

Expanded Narrative – Educational resources, offers materials to for lecturers, predominately in higher education, for integrating locative narrative into the arts curriculum. The resources are made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Expanded Narrative – News, highlights forthcoming international conferences and events and offers reviews of recent publications and events .